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How to Fix Trash Bytes (A Guide)
LatiosMe Offline
Latios+Metagross Combination

18 Posts
Joined Aug 2012


You've just finished editing a pokemon. This pokemon is a pokemon that you plan on using on Wifi. So you download the pokemon to your game, log onto Nintendo WFC, and, to your utter disappointment, your pokemon isn't allowed on Wifi. You now check your pokemon using a legality checker and the checker returns this message:
Invalid Trash Bytes

If you're attempting to remedy these trash bytes, you've come to the right place. Note: Fixing trash bytes can be more on the complex side, so this guide is recommended for the experienced editor.

First, some basic information about trash bytes;
What are trash bytes?
Spoiler
Trash bytes are useless (hence the name trash) pieces of data that are only used for hack checking.
Where are these trash bytes located?
Spoiler
Trash bytes are located after the characters in a pokemon's (nick)name and after the OT characters. Trash bytes fill in the empty space after a name, going up to 11 spaces.

Now that you have a basic knowledge of what trash bytes are, let's continue on to fixing them.

How to fix trash bytes
Trash bytes are fixed in different ways depending upon the generation. Due to this, the guide has been split into separate generations, Gen 5, Gen 4, and Gen 3.

Originated in Gen 5

Pokemon Name:

1. In the “Nickname” box, type in the pokemon's name or the nickname you wish to give the pokemon.

2. Now count the characters that comprise the pokemon's name or its nickname. Take that number and subtract it from 11.

Note: The number you were left with in Step 2 is the number of trash byte sequences you need after the pokemon's name or nickname. A trash byte sequence is comprised of a back-slash, followed by four other characters. An example of one trash byte sequence could be \0702.

3. Take the number you were left with in Step 2 and subtract 2 from it. Remember this number, it will come into play later.

4. After the pokemon's name or its nickname, type \FFFF. This is known as an escape sequence. It lets the game know when the pokemon's name or nickname ends and the trash bytes begin.

5. Take the number that you were told to remember in Step 3 and type the sequence \0000 as many times as the number that you remembered. This should be after the escape sequence \FFFF.

6. Now type the terminator sequence \FFFF. A terminator sequence tells the game where the trash bytes end. Congrats, you've now fixed the trash bytes in the pokemon's name!


OT

1. The OT trash bytes for pokemon that originated in Gen 5 don't usually need correcting. Simply type in the name of the original trainer and you're done. However, if the trash bytes still need to be fixed, use the steps below.

2. Count the number of characters in the OT name and subtract it from 8.

3. Take the number you were left with in Step 2 and subtract 1. Remember this number.

4. After the OT name, type the escape sequence \FFFF. Then take the number you were told to remember and type the sequence \0000 as many times as that number. Again, as with how the trash bytes were fixed in the pokemon's name, this/these sequences should be inputted after the escape sequence \FFFF. You've now finished correcting your pokemon's trash bytes.



Originated in Gen 4

1. In the “Nickname” box, type in the pokemon's name or the nickname you wish to give the pokemon.

2. Now count the characters that comprise the pokemon's name or its nickname. Take that number and subtract it from 11.

Note: The number you were left with in Step 2 is the number of trash byte sequences you need after the pokemon's name or nickname. A trash byte sequence is comprised of a back-slash, followed by four other characters. An example of one trash byte sequence could be \0702.

3. Take the number you were left with in Step 2 and subtract 2 from it. Remember this number, it will come into play later.

4. After the pokemon's name or its nickname, type \FFFF. This is known as an escape sequence. It lets the game know when the pokemon's name or nickname ends and the trash bytes begin.

5. Take the number that you were told to remember in Step 3 and type the sequence \0000 as many times as the number that you remembered. This should be after the escape sequence \FFFF.

6. Now type the terminator sequence \FFFF. A terminator sequence tells the game where the trash bytes end. Congrats, you've now fixed the trash bytes in the pokemon's name!


OT

1. Count the number of characters in the OT name and subtract it from 8.

2. Take the number you were left with in Step 1 and subtract 2. Remember this number.

3. After the OT name, type the escape sequence \FFFF. Then take the number you were told to remember and type the sequence \0000 as many times as that number. Again, as with how the trash bytes were fixed in the pokemon's name, this/these sequences should be inputted after the escape sequence \FFFF.

5. Again, as with fixing the trash bytes in the pokemon's name, type in the terminator sequence \FFFF. You've now finished correcting your pokemon's trash bytes.



Originated in Gen 3

Note: The way to fix these trash bytes is the most complex of all trash bytes, so be ready.

1. In the “Nickname” box, type in the pokemon's name or the nickname you wish to give the pokemon.

2. Now count the characters that comprise the pokemon's name or its nickname. Take that number and subtract it from 11.

Note: The number you were left with in Step 2 is the number of trash byte sequences you need after the pokemon's name or nickname. A trash byte sequence is comprised of a back-slash, followed by four other characters. An example of one trash byte sequence could be \0702.

3. Take the number you were left with in Step 2 and subtract 1 from it. Remember this number, it will come into play later.

4. After the pokemon's name or its nickname, type \FFFF. This is known as an escape sequence. It lets the game know when the pokemon's name or nickname ends and the trash bytes begin.

5.
\1820\0D02\4200\0000\0000\0000\48A1\0C02\E0FF
\2018\020D\0042\0000\0000\0000\A148\020C\FFE0

Count backward from the top line above, called a strand, the amount of sequences that equal the number that you were left with in Step 3.

6. Take the sequences that you counted over and move down to the bottom line that corresponds to the sequence above. Type these corresponding sequences after your pokemon's name and the sequence \FFFF. If this was done for a Gen 3 pokemon migrated to Gen 4 you're done. If it's for a Gen 3 pokemon transferred to Gen 5, you'll need to remove the last sequence, \FFE0 and replace it with \FFFF. Now you've finished.


OT

1. Count the number of characters in the OT name.

2. In your head, remove as many characters from the beginning of your pokemon's nickname as the OT name has characters.

3. After the “removed” characters, highlight the rest of your pokemon's nickname, trash bytes and all. Copy these characters.

5. Go to the box with the OT name. After the OT name, paste the characters that you had copied in Step 3. This should correct your OT name trash bytes.



Wi-Fi Gift Pokemon
For these pokemon (in any generation), the sequence \FFFF replaces the other trash bytes sequences that would normally be present. This is for the pokemon's nickname only: the OT trash bytes stay the same. Instead of \FFFF\0000\0000\FFFF the trash bytes would be \FFFF\FFFF\FFFF\FFFF.


After you've finished correcting your pokemon's trash bytes, it might be a good idea to use a legality checker to view whether or not you've actually fixed them.

Well, that concludes this guide. I hope that you've found it to be useful in making 100% legal pokemon via PokeSav or Pokegen. If you have any questions, leave me a message in my profile and I'll see what I can do to help.
(This post was last modified: 08-31-2012 09:57 PM by LatiosMe.)
08-11-2012 01:02 AM
Frankenmoo Offline
New Trainer

1 Posts
Joined Jun 2013


Hello,

I had generated a Darkrai not too long ago, and I referred to your guide when adjusting its trash bytes, as your guide has helped me in the past. Once I finished creating the pokemon, I used a legality checker to verify if the pokemon was legal. It told me it had invalid trash bytes, and I can't figure out why for the life of me. I used the gen 4 method for the OT, but it still comes up as invalid. The pokemon's Trash Byte sequence is Shade\FFFF\0000\0000\0000\0000\FFFF, and the Trainer's Trash Byte Sequence is Cris\FFFF\0000\0000\FFFF. I was hoping you could review these bytes and let me know whats wrong. Btw, the pokemon originated from Gen 4.

Thanks
06-23-2013 02:45 AM
Fancie Offline
New Trainer

1 Posts
Joined Jan 2014


For the 3rd generation OT name trash bytes I cant seem to make it work could you help me out? my trainer name is red and my pokemon is nicknamed is Mickey. it worked out for the nickname but I cant see to make the OT trash bytes work.
01-15-2014 06:45 AM
PikachuFreak Away
Pikachu Masta'

3,676 Posts
Joined Sep 2009


The original poster hasn't visited in over a year, so you're likely not going to get a response. I would suggest sending a Private Message so that they will get a notification in their email. Smile

*Locked*

[Image: LejOigR.png]
Thanks for the avatar and siggy Galdr! ^_^
EPIC WIN:
Spoiler

Thireven Wrote:Nah, PF totally plays Pikachuball.

01-15-2014 08:05 AM
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